Tag Archives: PowerShell

Exporting and Importing Active Directory OU Structures

Recently I needed to build out some test Active Directory Forests that resemble production in order to complete some testing. One of the forests contained a significant amount of OU’s that I had no intention of manually recreating.

To run the New-ADOrganizationalUnit cmdlet, you need to provide the OU name and the Path where you want to create it. However, Get-ADOrganizationalUnit doesn’t provide the path, so you need to determine it from the DistinguishedName.

After a number of google searches, I couldn’t find exactly what I needed, so I began piecing together various bits of Powershell that I found. I ended up learning a bit of Regex in the process! Powerful tool if you know how to use it.

I came up with two versions in the end, you can see both below with the differences highlighted.

$OUs=Get-ADOrganizationalUnit -Filter * | select name,DistinguishedName,@{n=’OUPath’;e={$_.distinguishedName -replace '^.+?,',''}},@{n=’OUNum’;e={([regex]::Matches($_.distinguishedName, “OU=” )).count}} | Sort OUNum | export-csv C:\<Path_to_CSV>\OUTree.csv -NoTypeInformation
$OUs=Get-ADOrganizationalUnit -Filter * | select name,DistinguishedName,@{n=’OUPath’;e={$_.distinguishedName -replace '^.+?,(CN|OU|DC.+)','$1'}},@{n=’OUNum’;e={([regex]::Matches($_.distinguishedName, “OU=” )).count}} | Sort OUNum | export-csv C:\<Path_to_CSV>\OUTree.csv -NoTypeInformation

The first one effectively takes everything up to the first ‘,’ and replaces it with nothing, effectively removing the OU Name. The second one captures everything after the first ‘,’ and replaces the whole string with what was captured. Both have produced the same result in my scenario, but it was useful to understand both methods for future use of Regex.

Both also have a property called ‘OUNum’, this property counts how many time ‘OU=’ appears in the original DistigushedName string. OU’s need to be created in order, so that the parent OU exists before the child. This orders the OU’s in ‘tiers’ before exporting them to CSV. All OU’s in the root of the directory will get a value of 1, OU’s within these will get a value of 2 and so on. Credit to ‘David Z’ for this bit!

Once you have your data, you may or may not need to modify the domain. If you are importing it into a different domain, you’ll need to. In my case it was simple enough to do a find and replace in a text editor (eg. DC=lab,DC=local to DC=lab2,DC=local). You could look at using concepts from above to achieve this before exporting the data if you so wish.

Now you have your data, you need to import it. You can run the following in the target domain.

$OUs = import-csv C:\<Path_to_CSV>\OUTree.csv
ForEach ($OU in $OUs) 
          {New-ADOrganizationalUnit -Name $OU.Name -Path $OU.OUPath}

Hope this has been useful. Thanks for reading!

Home Lab – Equipment and Software: Part 1

Thanks for coming back! If you missed the first post in my Home Lab series you can find it here.

In this post I will begin drilling into the equipment and software that makes up my Home Lab and my reasoning for these choices.

I’m going to skip the original Raspberry Pi, there are enough blogs covering the use cases for them and begin at the first significant device; my MacBook Pro (late 2013). I wanted something mobile to start with so I could take it to work, use it on commutes to other offices etc. The MacBook came with an Intel i7 2.3Ghz Quad core chip, 16GB of memory and a 512GB SSD. This wasn’t going to be able to run everything, but its enough to run what I need when I’m away from home.

Before I dive into the VM’s and nested hosts, lets look at the networking configuration I used in VMware Fusion. I created four custom networks in total. One being a Management network for my ESXi Hosts and my VCSA. The second for vMotion and the other two as guest VM networks. None of these networks are NAT’d or have DHCP enabled, however I have selected the ‘Connect the host Mac to this network option in the VMware Fusion Preferences for the management network.

There are two ways to set these custom networks up. The first being the UBER Network Fuser and the second, editing the VMWare Fusion network file. In ‘/Library/Preferences/VMWare Fusion’, you will find the file called ‘networking’.

There are guides already available if you search google for either option so I won’t go into this further. This is the one I used – https://tinyurl.com/y7cjkhky.

Now onto the virtual machines. Running directly on VMware Fusion, I have a Windows Domain Controller / DNS Server, a PFSense firewall and two 6.7 ESXi hosts. They all use local storage, including the ESXi Datastores. My PFSense virtual firewall provides my layer 3 routing and eventually interfaces with my physical firewall. The Domain Controller/DNS Server is a ‘standard’ deployment, nothing special. The two ESXi hosts are the standard 6.7 image available from the VMUG Advantage subscription. Check out the last post for more on VMUG.

Then within ESXi, there’s my vCenter Appliance and the DR node of my vSphere Replication Appliances. At this point you might be wondering how I have fit this into 16GB of memory…

To start with, I built the first ESXi host with 12GB of memory and deployed my vCenter appliance on this (the tiny appliance requires 10GB). Once I had successfully deployed the appliance, I reduced the vCenter memory to 6GB and then followed this by reducing the ESXi host to 7GB.

I then created the second ESXi host, which also has has 7GB allocated. Its a tight squeeze but it allows me the basics I need when I’m not at home and there’s still enough room for some small VM’s with the nested ESXi hosts if needed.

One final thing… To ease the starting and suspension of this lab, I use the following script that I run from PowerShell on the Mac.

Lab_Start_Up

Write-Host "Starting PFSense Firewall"
vmrun start "/Users/<Path_to_VM>/PFSense.vmwarevm" nogui
Write-Host "Starting DC01"
vmrun start "/Users/<Path_to_VM>/DC01/DC01.vmwarevm" nogui
Write-Host "Starting ESX01"
vmrun start "/Users/<Path_to_VM>/ESX01/ESX01.vmwarevm" nogui
Write-Host "Starting ESX02"
vmrun start "/Users/<Path_to_VM>/ESX02/ESX02.vmwarevm" nogui

Write-Host "Start Up Complete!"

Lab_Supend

vmrun suspend "/Users/<Path_to_VM>/ESX02/ESX02.vmwarevm"
vmrun suspend "/Users/<Path_to_VM>/ESX01/ESX01.vmwarevm"
vmrun suspend "/Users/<Path_to_VM>/DC01/DC01.vmwarevm"
vmrun suspend "/Users/<Path_to_VM>/PFSense.vmwarevm"

Write-Host "Suspension Complete!"

That wraps up the high level MacBook Pro setup. Thanks for reading!

Installing PowerCLI using Install-Module

I was asked recently ‘Do we have PowerCLI downloaded?’.  Yes, we may, but it could be anywhere and it is likely an outdated version.

There is no need to download the installer! You can install PowerCLI using the Install-Module cmdlet in Windows PowerShell. (Providing you have an internet connection!) Below we will look at the steps required to install the latest version of PowerCLI on your system.

From an elevated PowerShell prompt run the following –

Install-Module VMware.PowerCLI.

If you don’t already have it installed, you will be prompted to install the NuGet Provider. Type ‘y’ and enter to continue.

You will get a further prompt to confirm you are happy to install a module from the ‘PSGallery’. Again, ‘y’ and enter to continue.

The PowerCLI Module will then begin to install. It will cycle through installing multiple dependent packages which will take a few minutes. Sit back and wait…

Once returned to the prompt, you can confirm the installation by running –

Get-Module VMware.PowerCLI -List Available | FL

You have now installed PowerCLI version 12.0.0.15947286. You will likely end up installing a later version.

Last step, load the module for use

Import-Module VMware.PowerCLI

You’re ready to go! But…

Not every system you need to use this module on will have internet access. In this, case the ‘Save-Module’ cmdlet is your friend.

Save-Module -Name VMware.PowerCLI -Path <Path to directory>

The module will then proceed to be downloaded into the directory you have specified and will look like this –

On your target server, you will need to confirm your module paths. You can do this by using the following command. You may have more than one path.

$env:PSModulePath

Now copy the directory that contains the module you have saved, to a module path on the target server. Likely ‘C:\Programfiles\WindowsPowerShell\Modules’ on a Windows System.

Now the Module is on your system, all that’s left is to import the module as above –

Import-Module VMware.PowerCLI

Thanks for reading! Hope this has been of use and catch you in the next post.